Until his unexpected recent release from prison, Weldon Angelos, 36, thought he would be behind bars until he was 72 for selling marijuana while carrying a gun. Instead, Angelos has been reunited with his family and is a free man after 13 years in prison of a 55-year-sentence. "I felt like a big burden was lifted," said Angelos. "I was just so relieved and excited to call my sister to tell her the news."   

Until his unexpected recent release from prison, Weldon Angelos, 36, thought he would be behind bars until he was 72 for selling marijuana while carrying a gun. Instead, Angelos has been reunited with his family and is a free man after 13 years in prison of a 55-year-sentence. "I felt like a big burden was lifted," said Angelos. "I was just so relieved and excited to call my sister to tell her the news."

 

 The City Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, is a giant playground for all ages. From a rooftop ferris wheel to a giant ball pit, the museum is full of fun. 

The City Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, is a giant playground for all ages. From a rooftop ferris wheel to a giant ball pit, the museum is full of fun. 

 During a typical work day, Ali Youngblood can be found managing a lab in Odgen, Utah, at Systematic Formulas. Outside of work, Youngblood can be found pursuing her passion, behind the steering wheel of a 1932 Ford Roadster named "Popeye." Five years ago, Ali followed in her father's and brother's footsteps and began racing. After achieving success and garnering some speed records, Youngblood decided to quench her need for speed at the famed Bonneville Salt Flats. Despite her success, at times she still has to endure the prejudice associated with of being a woman in a sport dominated by men. "I get a lot of people saying this is a man's sport and that women can't race," said Ali Youngblood. "It makes me more passionate now just to prove those people wrong; and I have."

During a typical work day, Ali Youngblood can be found managing a lab in Odgen, Utah, at Systematic Formulas. Outside of work, Youngblood can be found pursuing her passion, behind the steering wheel of a 1932 Ford Roadster named "Popeye." Five years ago, Ali followed in her father's and brother's footsteps and began racing. After achieving success and garnering some speed records, Youngblood decided to quench her need for speed at the famed Bonneville Salt Flats. Despite her success, at times she still has to endure the prejudice associated with of being a woman in a sport dominated by men. "I get a lot of people saying this is a man's sport and that women can't race," said Ali Youngblood. "It makes me more passionate now just to prove those people wrong; and I have."

 Monia Ritter, 94, was born in Russia but lived most of her younger years in France. She came to the U.S. in 1950. "When I came to the States, I got a letter from the president saying, 'Welcome to the States,' and I cried because I was finally welcome somewhere." Ritter ended up in Bowling Green, Kentucky., a fate she considered a result of her checkered past. "I'm telling everybody that I am paying for my sins in youth by ending my life in the Bible Belt."

Monia Ritter, 94, was born in Russia but lived most of her younger years in France. She came to the U.S. in 1950. "When I came to the States, I got a letter from the president saying, 'Welcome to the States,' and I cried because I was finally welcome somewhere." Ritter ended up in Bowling Green, Kentucky., a fate she considered a result of her checkered past. "I'm telling everybody that I am paying for my sins in youth by ending my life in the Bible Belt."

 Barbara Davis, 77, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and grew up being a talented artist. While she was out shopping, Davis, walked past a closing department store that caught her eye. She saw two paper mache carousel horses in the window and asked the store owner if they were for sell. The owner said no and Davis replied, "Fine, I'll go home and make my own." Davis now lives in Bowling Green Retirement Village in Kentucky and suffers from both dementia and arthritis. Even though she is unable to create art anymore, she fills her room with art including her carousel horses.

Barbara Davis, 77, was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and grew up being a talented artist. While she was out shopping, Davis, walked past a closing department store that caught her eye. She saw two paper mache carousel horses in the window and asked the store owner if they were for sell. The owner said no and Davis replied, "Fine, I'll go home and make my own." Davis now lives in Bowling Green Retirement Village in Kentucky and suffers from both dementia and arthritis. Even though she is unable to create art anymore, she fills her room with art including her carousel horses.

 Organist, Kenneth Stein, walks through a door way after dong technical repairs on the church organ before the start  of a English church service at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Bowling Green, Kentucky on Saturday, September 3, 2016.    

Organist, Kenneth Stein, walks through a door way after dong technical repairs on the church organ before the start  of a English church service at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Bowling Green, Kentucky on Saturday, September 3, 2016. 

 

 Roy Duke, 57, has lived on Glen Lily Road for 3 years but has been in Bowling Green, Ky., all his life. "I'm growing my hair out because I'm trying to hang on to the old'n days back in the 70's," said Duke. "I feel young inside, I just don't have my brown hair anymore."

Roy Duke, 57, has lived on Glen Lily Road for 3 years but has been in Bowling Green, Ky., all his life. "I'm growing my hair out because I'm trying to hang on to the old'n days back in the 70's," said Duke. "I feel young inside, I just don't have my brown hair anymore."